Data Dashboard

Promise Neighborhoods grantees collect data aligned to 10 results for students, families, and the community. Data is presented for the 2011, 2012, 2016, and 2017 grantee cohorts. Choose a result and cohort to view the results.

Academic Profiency

Students are proficient in core academic subjects as measured by the share of third through eighth graders and high schoolers who are at or above grade level on state mathematics and English language arts assessments.

Description of Indicator: Percent of students at or above grade level according to State mathematics assessments in at least the grades required by the ESEA (3rd through 8th and once in high school).

Grantee 1

100% 50% 0%
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Grantee 2

100% 50% 0%
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Grantee 3

100% 50% 0%
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Grantee 4

100% 50% 0%
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Grantee 5

100% 50% 0%
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
Summary

Two grantees showed improvements in this area. Data for grantee 4 does not include a high school grade. Grantees that have made progress on this indicator use academic data to target students at risk of falling behind, provide academic case management, and have implemented new curriculums at target high schools. Challenges to increasing proficiency include scaling strategies to reach all students at target schools.

Academic Profiency

Students are proficient in core academic subjects as measured by the share of third through eighth graders and high schoolers who are at or above grade level on state mathematics and English language arts assessments.

Description of Indicator: Percent of students at or above grade level according to State English language arts assessments in at least the grades required by the ESEA (3rd through 8th and once in high school). 

Grantee 1

100% 50% 0%
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Grantee 2

100% 50% 0%
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Grantee 3

100% 50% 0%
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Grantee 4

100% 50% 0%
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Grantee 5

100% 50% 0%
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5
Summary

Two grantees showed improvements in this area. Data for grantee 4 does not include a high school grade. Grantees that have made progress on this indicator use academic data to target students at risk of falling behind, provide academic case management, and provide professional development to increase teacher effectiveness in target schools. Challenges to increasing proficiency include scaling strategies to reach all students at target schools.

2012 Cohort Key Facts

 

Boston Promise Initiative

Chula Vista Promise Neighborhood

DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative

East Lubbock Promise Neighborhood

Indianola Promise Community

Los Angeles Promise Neighborhood

Mission Promise Neighborhood

Overall Population

27,451 

6,744  

5,725  

26,560  

10,683  

97,778 

51,255  

Urbanicity

Urban

Urban

Urban

Urban

Rural

Urban

Urban

Children under age 18

7,056 

1,848 

1,801 

9,321 

3,013 

30,504 

7,190 

Number of participating schools

4

5

3

6

4

18

4

Percent living in poverty

30%

33%

47%

33%

33%

47-56%

14%

 

View infographics for 2012 Grantees Key Facts

Glossary

The entries in this glossary are detailed descriptions of the measures that Promise Neighborhoods Grantees were asked to report on. Terms are organized by result and the definition includes the indicator(s) to which it applies.


School Readiness

Children enter kindergarten ready to succeed in school as measured by the share of children from birth through age five who have a medical home, demonstrate age-appropriate functioning at both three years old and the start of kindergarten, and participate in early learning settings or programs.

Medical Home

Data Note: Data for this result come from the Neighborhood Survey, which is conducted in years 1, 3, and 5 of the Promise Neighborhoods grant. Promise Neighborhoods implement a Neighborhood Survey based on a random sample using three questions from the National Survey of Children’s Health 2011 to determine whether children ages 0 to 5 have access to a medical home.

The target population is children living in the Promise Neighborhood who are ages 0-5.

Data are collected on individual children and are stored in the Neighborhood-level data system.

Definitions

Medical Home: Places where families have an ongoing relationship with a physician who provides continuous and comprehensive care coordinated (and can be integrated) with other services.

Age-appropriate functioning

Data Note: Promise Neighborhoods collect assessment data from their early child care providers for three-year-olds and kindergarten students attending the targeted early learning centers or target schools. The assessment data include the number and percent of children who met or exceeded age-appropriate expectations for criterion-referenced assessments, or who are at or above age equivalency for norm-referenced assessments (or some other comparable category). If the scores for the individual domains can be disaggregated, Promise Neighborhoods report the information in this format as well.  

Because Promise Neighborhoods report on age-appropriate functioning using assessment tools that are specific to their target schools and programs, data on this result cannot be compared across grantees. 

Participation in Early Learning

Data Note: Data for this result come from a neighborhood survey, which grantees are advised to conduct in years 1, 3, and 5 of the Promise Neighborhoods grant. Survey data are collected from a random sample of parents with children ages 0-5. The recommended series of questions are a subset of questions from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Birth Cohort National 9-Month parent questionnaire. 

The target population is children living in the Promise Neighborhood who are ages 0-5.

Definitions

Center-based early learning settings and programs: Center-based early learning settings and programs include Early Head Start, Head Start, community center-based care, and publicly-funded preschool or prekindergarten classes (i.e., PK3, PK4). 

Developmentally-appropriate learning measures: Schools’ and centers’ assessments should be conducted in a manner consistent with the recommendations from the Committee on Developmental Outcomes and Assessments for Young Children on early childhood assessment.

Formal home-based early learning settings: There is no nationally recognized definition of “formal home-based early learning settings.” In some cases, formal home-based early learning settings are defined as home settings that meet state standards for licensure so unlicensed family, friend, and neighbor care would not qualify as “formal.” However, families may not recognize the distinction between licensed and unlicensed home-based early child care settings.

Multiple domains of early learning: The multiple domains of early learning to be assessed are: language and literacy development, cognition and general knowledge, approaches toward learning, physical well-being and motor development including adaptive skills, and social and emotional development.

Academic Proficiency 

Students are proficient in core academic subjects as measured by the share of third through eighth graders and high schoolers who are at or above grade level on state mathematics and English language arts assessments.

At or Above Grade Level in Math 

Data Note: Data for this result come from administrative data that are collected annually in target schools on children who are in 3rd through 8th grade and once when students are in high school. Local school districts calculate the number and percentage of students attending target schools at the appropriate grades who tested proficient or advanced in math and share these statistics with the Promise Neighborhoods. 

The data are collected at grade level.

At or Above Grade Level in English

Data Note: Data for this result come from administrative data that are collected annually in target schools on children who are in 3rd through 8th grade and once when students are in high school. Local school districts calculate the number and percentage of students attending target schools at the appropriate grades who tested proficient or advanced in English language arts and share these statistics with the Promise Neighborhoods. 

The data are collected at grade level.

Successful Transitions

Students successfully transition from middle school grades to high school as measured by the average daily attendance and/or chronic absenteeism rate of students in 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th grades.

Data Note: Data for this result come from administrative data that are collected annually on children who are in 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th grades who attend target schools. Local school districts calculate the average daily attendance for students in 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th grades. Promise Neighborhoods are encouraged to work with their school districts to calculate a chronic absenteeism rate using local attendance data, relying on both excused and unexcused absences. School districts provide the grade-level aggregated number and percent of students for the target schools to Promise Neighborhood sites for their reports.

The data are collected at grade level.

Definitions

Chronic absenteeism: A student is defined as chronically absent if s/he is absent for excused or unexcused reasons for 10% or more of the available school days. 

High School Graduation 

Youth graduate from high school as measured by the four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate among target high schools.

Data Note: Data for this result come from administrative data that are collected annually on children who attend target high schools. Due to the complexity of tracking a 9th grade cohort, Promise Neighborhoods collect the four-year or extended-year adjusted cohort graduation rate calculated by the school district for each target high school.

The data are collected for individual ninth-grade cohorts.

Definitions

Adjusted cohort: Includes the students who enter grade 9 (or the earliest high school grade) and any students who transfer into the cohort in grades 9 through 12 minus any students removed from the cohort. 

Extended-year adjusted cohort graduation rate: In addition to calculating a four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate, a State may propose to the Secretary for approval an ‘‘extended-year adjusted cohort graduation rate. An extended-year adjusted cohort graduation rate means the number of students who graduate in four years or more with a regular high school diploma divided by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for the four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate, provided that the adjustments account for any students who transfer into the cohort by the end of the year of graduation being considered minus the number of students who transfer out, emigrate to another country, or are deceased by the end of that year. 

Graduation rate: Graduation rate is defined the four-year adjusted cohort rate is defined in 34 CFR 200.19 (b)(1)1. 

Regular high school diploma: The standard high school diploma that is awarded to students in the state and that is fully aligned with the state’s academic content standards or a higher diploma and does not include a GED credential, certificate of attendance, or any alternative award. 

Removing a student from the cohort: To remove a student from the cohort, a school or LEA must confirm in writing that the student transferred out, emigrated to another country, or is deceased. To confirm that a student transferred out, the school or LEA must have official written documentation that the student enrolled in another school or in an educational program that culminates in the award of a regular high school diploma. A student who is retained in-grade, enrolls in a General Educational Development (GED) program, or leaves school for any other reason may not be counted as having transferred out for the purpose of calculating graduation rate and must remain in the adjusted cohort. 

Students who graduate in four years: Students who earn a regular high school diploma at the conclusion of their fourth year, before the conclusion of their fourth year, or during a summer session immediately following their fourth year. 

Students who transfer into the cohort: Students who enroll after the beginning of the entering cohort’s first year in high school, up to and including in grade 12. 

College & Career Ready

High school graduates obtain a postsecondary degree, certification or credential as measured by the share of high school graduates who enroll in a college or university, place into college-level mathematics and English without need for remediation, graduate from a post-secondary institution within traditional completion time, and/or earn industry-recognized certificates or credentials.

Data Note: Data for this result come from privately operated post-secondary tracking services. These types of organizations track high school seniors who matriculated from participating high schools and identify whether they enrolled in public and private two- and four-year colleges and universities as well as trade and vocational programs. Promise Neighborhoods ensure that their target high schools participate with these private tracking services, and that the primary two- and four-year colleges and universities where the majority of Promise Neighborhood students continue for their post-secondary educations participate as well. The post-secondary tracking services can provide aggregated reports about the enrollment and matriculation of high school cohorts. 

These data are collected annually for high school graduates from the targeted schools. 

The data are collected at graduation cohort level. 

Another potential source of data for this result are the Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems (SLDS). The purpose of the SLDS is to integrate the data systems that track educational attainment for children in early learning programs through youth who enter the workforce by integrating preschool, K12, and higher education data systems into one P—20 data system. These data systems include individual student records.

Definitions

Industry-recognized certificates and credentials: Industry-recognized certificates and credentials are typically defined as a professional, industry, employer organization, or product manufacturer using a valid and reliable assessment of an individual’s knowledge, skills, and abilities for a particular industry skill set. 

Remedial classes: Remedial classes are basic math or English classes for students who are significantly behind the expected level for a class. Remedial classes do not typically qualify toward graduation credits. 

Traditional length of time for associate’s degrees: The traditional length of time for associate’s degrees is two years after first enrolling (or 100% time). Students that complete in 150% of time are enrolled for three years. 

Traditional length of time for four-year colleges and universities: The traditional length of time for four-year colleges and universities is within four years (or 100% time). Students that complete in 150% of time graduate six years after entering. 

Traditional length of time for vocational and technical programs and certificates: The traditional length of time for vocational and technical programs and certificates depends on the particular program. 

Healthy Students 

Students are healthy as measured by the share of middle and high school students who report that they participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily and/or consume five or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily.

Physical Activity

Data Note: Data for this result come from an annual school climate survey, which surveys middle and high school students who attend target schools. Data are collected directly from students. Questions about physical activity are from the 2011 Youth Risk Behavioral Survey. 

The data are collected at the individual level.  

Definitions

Moderate to vigorous physical activity: Students engage in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day (i.e., aerobic activity, muscle strengthening activity, and bone strengthening activity). Aerobic activity includes brisk walking (moderate intensity) or running (vigorous intensity). Muscle strengthening activities include push-ups and gymnastics. Bone strengthening activities include running and jumping rope. Children can participate in organized sports to meet the activity levels, but also playtime during and after school counts.  

School climate survey: A census of students (all students) from all grades. 

Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

Data Note: Data for this result come from an annual school climate survey, which surveys middle and high school students who attend target schools. This survey collects information about the number of times a day middle and high school students at the target Promise Neighborhood schools consume fruits and vegetables during the past seven days.

The data are collected at the individual level.

Safe Communities

Students feel safe at school and in their community as measured by the share of middle and high school students who report that they feel safe at school and/or traveling to and from school.

Data Note: Data for this result come from an annual school climate survey, which surveys middle and high school students who attend target schools. Target middle and high schools administer a school climate survey including one question from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students National Evaluation School Climate Survey (a collaborative grant program supported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Justice) and one question that the technical assistance team developed. 

The data are collected at the individual level.

Stable Communities

Students live in stable communities as measured by the student mobility rate, which is the total number of both student entries and withdrawals at all target schools.

Data Note: The student mobility rate is an aggregated statistic to include all the target Promise Neighborhood schools. Data for this result come from administrative data that are collected annually on children in elementary, middle, and high schools who attend target schools. Local school districts for each of the target schools provide Promise Neighborhoods with the number of student entries and withdraws between the time of the official count and the end of the school year as well as the official student count for the school year. 

The data are collected at the school level. 

Definitions

Student mobility rate: The number of student entries and withdraws at target Promise Neighborhood schools, from the first day of official enrollment is collected until the end of the academic school year, divided by the first official enrollment count of the academic year.

Supportive Communities  

Families and community members support learning in Promise Neighborhood schools as measured by the share of parents who report that they read to their children at least three times a week from birth to kindergarten, encourage their children to read outside of school from kindergarten through 8th grade, and/or talk to their high school children about the importance of college and career.

Reading to Children

Data Note: Data for this result come from a neighborhood survey, which grantees are advised to conduct in years 1, 3, and 5 of the Promise Neighborhoods grant. Promise Neighborhoods collect data on reading to children data using a survey of a random sample of residents from the Promise Neighborhood, using questions from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS) Birth Cohort National 9-Month parent questionnaire. 

The target population is children living in the Promise Neighborhood who are ages 0-5.

Data are collected on individual children.     

Encourage Reading 

Data Note: Data for this result come from a neighborhood survey, which grantees are advised to conduct in years 1, 3, and 5 of the Promise Neighborhoods grant. Data are collected by asking parents/guardians of children in kindergarten through 8th grade whether they read to their children or whether their children read to themselves or others outside of school. Parents either report reading to their child at least three times a week or report that their child read to themselves or others at least three times in the past week in order to meet the criteria for this indicator. These questions are from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Kindergarten Class of 1998-99.

The target population is children living in the Promise Neighborhood who are in kindergarten through 8th grade. 

Data are collected on individual children.     

Talk About College and Career

Data Note: Data for this result come from a neighborhood survey, which grantees are advised to conduct in years 1, 3, and 5 of the Promise Neighborhoods grant. These data are collected by surveying a random sample of residents from the Promise Neighborhood. Question 1 from the National Center for Education Statistics’ Educational Longitudinal Survey (2002) is used to measure this indicator.

The target population is children living in the Promise Neighborhood who are in 9th through 12th grade. 

Data are collected on individual children.     

21st Century Learning Tools

Students have access to 21st century learning tools as measured by the share of middle and high school students who report that they have school and/or home access to broadband internet and a connected computing device.

Data Note: Data for this result come from the annual school climate survey, which surveys middle and high school students who attend target schools. The data are collected directly from the children and youth, rather than from their parents or guardians. Target middle and high schools ask students about access to the internet at home and at school and about what type of technology students use to access the internet. The survey questions were adapted from school surveys developed by Project Tomorrow, a nonprofit organization that supports innovative uses of science, math, and technology in the classroom. 

The data are collected at the individual level.

Definitions

Internet access: Students can have access to the internet via computing devices like desktops or laptops provided in a computer lab or during their regular English class. Students could also have access to the internet at school or at home using tablets (e.g., iPads), cell phones, or smart phones (i.e., Wi-Fi or 3G/4G mobile device), and through video game systems like the Wii, TV/cable packages, e-readers, and MP3 players. For the purposes of this result, students who have access through any of these types of technologies both at home and at school qualify as having access.